October 25, 2021
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CSIR Latest News (88)

  • The Deputy Director- General of CSIR is advising the youth to venture into snail farming since the business is profitable.
  • There is a market for snails both locally and internationally due to its delicacy and medicinal benefits.
  • Forty participants including staff of the National Youth Authority, Agricultural Extension Agents and farmers have benefitted from a day’s training in snail farming.

Prof Paul Bosu, the Deputy Director-General of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has urged the youth to consider snail farming as an avenue for generating income.

He explained that, starting a snail farming business requires less capital and education; the interest to learn, invest and market the business.

Prof. Bosu spoke at a training session held for farmers, agriculture extension officers and players within the agribusiness industry.

The training was organised by CSIR in collaboration with the Modernising Agriculture in Ghana (MAG) programme at CSIR-Plant Genetics Resources Research Institute, Bunsu in the Eastern Region.

The Deputy Director-General further urged the youth to be optimistic in starting the business adding that, it has significant outcomes.

Some of the participants at the workshop, he hinted were beneficiaries of a skills training programme by the National Youth Authority (NYA) in Koforidua.

“Explore and apply yourselves to some of these things and you may never know, this thing may lead you to your dream”, he said. 

With respect to the inclusion of snails in diets, Prof. Bosu said, it is rich in protein, iron, calcium and low in fat which are needed by the body and noted, the consumption of snails has been on high demand.

He attributed the high consumption of snails in recent times to the realisation of the essence of eating healthy diets by many Ghanaians.

Mrs. Mary Appiah, a senior marketing officer at the CSIR-Forestry Research Institute of Ghana (CSIR-FORIG) urged the participants to keep basic marketing practices including the need to promote the sale of their snails with effective communication and the willingness to negotiate with their customers should there be any loss.  

The topics treated at the training were; getting started with snail farming, breeding and diseases and pests management.

Meanwhile, over the past three years, CSIR has trained about 1,500 farmers and agricultural extension officers throughout the country.

MAG is a five-year initiative programme funded by the Canadian government that focuses attention on demand driven research and alternative methods of extension delivery with the objective of increasing productivity through intensive farming. MAG provides budgetary support to the Agricultural Research Institutes within CSIR. 

CSIR was established in 1958 and currently has thirteen research institutes, a Head Office and over fifty Research Centres, Units and Field Stations

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Prof. Paul Bosu (5th from right) the Deputy Director-General of CSIR with other participants in a group photograph.  

 

Source: Corporate Affairs Division, CSIR

  • A number of local plant breeders and research scientists have had to deal with ownership rights of their breeds from people who ‘steal’ their works without acknowledgment.
  • Local Plant Breeders will soon have no cause to worry as CSIR has commenced advocacy for the implementation of the PVP system.
  • The PVP system is a law that seeks to protect the intellectual property rights of breeders of new varieties of plants.

 

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is advocating for the implementation of the Plant Variety (PVP) System to protect the intellectual property (IP) rights of local plant breeders.

The PVP system is a law that seeks to protect the intellectual property rights of breeders of new varieties of plants. 

A number of local plant breeders and research scientists have had to deal with ownership rights of their breeds from people who ‘steal’ their works without acknowledgment, hence the move by CSIR to conduct this workshop to deepen the understanding and implementation of the PVP system.

At the opening session of a two-day workshop organised by CSIR with support from CORAF-Partnership for Agricultural Research, Education and Development (PAIRED) Project and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Prof. Paul Bosu, the Deputy Director-General of CSIR, expressed delight at the support from CORAF for Ghana and five other countries (Benin, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and Senegal) within the sub-region.

He added that, the workshop has become necessary to help plant breeders understand the need to protect their IP rights.

“It is hoped that through this workshop, a better understanding of the PVP system will be established, awareness will be created and the needed capacity will be built for licensing agreement between research and seed companies”, he averred.

Mrs. Cynthia Asare-Bediako, the Chief Director of MESTI who was also the Chairperson at the workshop assured the participants of pushing the discussion on the PVP system further to protect the rights of local breeders.

She said “intellectual property rights of plant variety gives the breeder the exclusive rights on how to exploit and release the innovation in the most appropriate way for collective use” adding that, since Ghana largely depends on agriculture for economic growth the Ministry will ensure that the PVP system is implemented to the latter.

In his keynote address, Mr. Patrick Ankobiah, the Acting Chief Director at the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) said the PVP system when applied effectively can serve as a tool to encourage the release of new varieties of plants which will also promote food security.

Mr. Abrahamane Dicko, the Regional Coordinator for Agriculture Programme at the USAID Mission West Africa, said one of the benefits of the PVP system was to encourage private investment in plant variety breeding.

CSIR was established in 1958 and currently has thirteen research institutes, a Head Office and over fifty Research Centres, Units and Field Stations

CSIR pvp Workshop

Seated from right: Mr. Abrahamane Dicko, the Regional Coordinator for Agriculture Programme at the USAID Mission West Africa, Prof. Paul Bosu, the Deputy Director General of CSIR, Mrs. Cynthia Asare-Bediako, the Chief Director of MESTI, Mr. Patrick Ankobiah, Acting Chief Director, MoFA, Mrs. Grace Issahaque, Head of IP Ghana/Chief State Attorney, Prof. Hans Adu-Dapaah, Senior Research Scientist at CSIR-Crops Research Institute with other participants. 

Source: Corporate Affairs Division, CSIR

CSIR-SARI Signs MoU with Tamale Technical University to collaborate in training students

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)-Savannah Agricultural Research Institute (CSIR-SARI) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on Monday 6th September, 2021 with the Tamale Technical University (TaTU) to commence among other activities, the provision of practical training to students of the tertiary institution.

The parties have also agreed to explore viable ways of promoting research and innovation among staff of TaTU and CSIR-SARI as well as collaborate to develop and mount demand-driven courses in agriculture and engineering.  

Additionally, both parties have concurred to create access for the use of facilities and collaborate for joint grant proposals for research.

The MoU was signed between Prof. Victor Kwame Agyeman, the Director-General (D-G) of CSIR in the presence of Dr. Samuel Saaka Buah, the Acting Director of CSIR-SARI and Professor Abass Braimah, the Vice-Chancellor of TaTU in the presence of Mr. Iddrisu Yakubu, the Registrar of the University at the D-Gs office in Accra. 

TaTU CSIR SARI MOU2

CSIR was established in 1958 and has thirteen research institutes. CSIR-SARI which is one of the institutes, is situated in Nyankpala near Tamale. It was established to support and promote cutting edge research to improved food and fibre crop production in northern Ghana with the potential to support the country’s socio economic development effort.

The TaTu is a tertiary institution accredited by the National Accreditation Board to provide higher education and undertake research in the fields of engineering, technical and vocational based disciplines, using practical and competency-based approach that would produce professionals for industry.

It was also was established in the Northern Region of Ghana under the Technical University Act, 2016 (Act 922) and the Technical Universities Amendment Act, 2018 (Act 974)

Source: Corporate Affairs Division, CSIR

‘Tolerate customers when they express frustrations at your product’

  • Responding to customer frustrations is critical in sustaining a business
  • Honey traders should consider their responses to frustrations and make amends if there is the need

Honey traders have been urged by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) to be tolerant and ready to answer their customers’ frustrations if they want to sustain the consumption of their products.

  • Checking your COVID-19 status is very important to help you know how to manage the spread.
  • The Director-General and the staff of the CSIR Head Office undergo COVID-19 testing to know their status.

Prof. Victor Agyeman, the Director-General of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has led the entire staff at the Head Office to undergo COVID-19 testing on Thursday, July 22, 2021.

Don’t fear atomic energy - Dr. Afriyie urges Ghanaians

  • It is high time we turned our attention to atomic energy as another way of generating electricity.
  • There is no need to fear atomic energy since it has lots of benefits as compared with the usage of gas energy.

Dr. Kwaku Afriyie, the Minister of Environment, Science, Technology, and Innovation (MESTI) has urged Ghanaians to disabuse their minds about the fear of atomic energy as an alternative source of power generation.

  • Being visible as an organisation causes people to know what an organisation does and calls for products and services when needed.
  • The MESTI Minister urges CSIR to consciously improve its visibility to let the public know more about their exploits.

Dr. Kwaku Afriyie, the Minister of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation (MESTI) has urged the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) to come out of their shells and make themselves more visible to the public.

Mr. Emmanuel Deteah, the Head of the National Board for Small Scale Industries (NBSSI) in the Central Region is urging agribusiness players to adopt digital marketing platforms to promote their Orange Fleshed Sweet Potatoes (OFSP) businesses.

At a two-day workshop organised for agribusiness players in the Central Region on OFSP, Mr. Deteah, urged the need to embrace the new way of marketing on the internet and expand knowledge on the usage of smartphones to do marketing.

According to him, “Now, facebook has a number of features beyond just posting pictures and receiving many likes from your relations at the expense of your OFSP business. Nobody pays anybody to advertise on facebook”.

Dr. John Edem Kongor, a research scientist at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research-Food Research Institute (CSIR-FRI) is urging players within the agribusiness industry especially food processors and value chain actors to process Orange-Fleshed Sweet Potato (OFSP) into flour as a value addition component to what they produce to sustain consistent consumption.

He said the traditional methods used to prepare the OFSP including frying, roasting boiling may eventually create boredom and draw away consumers, hence processing the produce into flour and adding it to all kinds of foods should be the new way to sustain consumption.

  • We live in a noisy world where people are inundated with information 24/7. If you want to make sure your audience hear what you have to say, and take the actions you’re hoping for, you must be strategic in your communication.
  • MITA is to promote the discovery of improved technologies and facilitate exchanges and purchase-sale transactions between promoters and users of improved technologies.
  • Actionable communication is about inspiring others to take an action either on your or someone else’s behalf

Ms. Benedicta Nkrumah-Boateng, the Head of Corporate Affairs at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), has said that, a major hindrance in communicating agricultural technologies is due to public perception that science is difficult. 

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